Experts: exercise is good for osteoporosis patients

Experts: Exercise can boost bone health of osteoporosis patients

Latest in Health
RUN WITH IT: An expert panel says exercise can make a big difference to the bone health of people with osteoporosis.

RUN WITH IT: An expert panel says exercise can make a big difference to the bone health of people with osteoporosis.

Aa

Experts say the right amount of exercise can benefit people with osteoporosis.

Aa

People with osteoporosis might be wary of the impact exercise may have on their bodies, but experts say it can greatly improve bone health.

An expert panel has released a joint statement on how to maximise bone health in the British Medical Journal of Sports Medicine - and the consensus is regular exercise is a good thing.

It says regular exercise can help those living with the bone disease stave off the risk of fracture, improve posture and reduce the risk of falls.

The panel recommends muscle strengthening exercises two to three days a week and brief bursts of moderate impact activities, such as jogging, aerobics, or Zumba on most days.

Even those who have sustained vertebral fractures are encouraged to partake in lower impact exercise, up to the level of brisk walking for up to 20 minutes a day.

It is estimated that 137 million women and 21 million men around the world have osteoporosis and its prevalence is expected to double within the next 40 years.

Regular exercise can also improve mental and overall physical health.

But uncertainty about what types of exercise people with osteoporosis, or at risk of developing the condition can safely do has left many clinicians unsure of what sort of activities they could safely recommend.

The multidisciplinary panel reviewed existing evidence and sought opinions from a wide range of experts and patients in a bid to clear up lingering confusion and its statement has been endorsed by the Royal Osteoporosis Society.

The panel's chair Dawn Skelton said anyone who was new to physical activity or unsure of technique should seek advice from a trained instructor.

"Those with a history of falls or serious concerns about their balance can contact their local falls service," Professor Skelton said.

To read the full report and list of recommendations click here.

Aa