Killer plants take over Gardens

Plants in Science Fiction at Adelaide Botanic Garden

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PLOT TWIST: Adelaide Botanic Garden is paying tribute to the killer plants of science fiction stories, such as War of the Worlds.

PLOT TWIST: Adelaide Botanic Garden is paying tribute to the killer plants of science fiction stories, such as War of the Worlds.

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Adelaide Botanic Garden is paying tribute to the bloodthirsty, plants of sci-fi.

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FROM The War of the Worlds, to Little Shop of Horrors and John Wyndham's The Day of the Triffids, plants have long proven fertile ground for science fiction writers.

Adelaide Botanic Garden is paying tribute to man-eating plants and villainous flora from the world of fiction, as it celebrates Plants in Science Fiction this month.

The Garden is hosting a series of exciting science fiction themed events as part of the Garden's Botanica Lumina program of after-dark events.

Botanic Gardens and State Herbarium director Michael Harvey said the program had been inspired by the 70th anniversary of the publication of The Day of the Triffids, which introduced one of the most famous plant "villains" of sci-fi history.

"So this summer we are exploring otherworldly, villainous and dangerous plants," he said.

The program includes an outdoor night time screening of classic film Little Shop of Horrors on Conifer Lawn tonight.

The cult 1986 musical combines elements of science fiction, horror and comedy and tells the story of a geeky florist's assistant who finds out his mysterious Venus Flytrap has a taste for human blood.

The lawns will open at 7.30pm with the screening to commence after sunset. Tickets are $20

Conifer Lawn will also host a hearing of classic audio play The War of the Worlds next Friday.

The lawns will once again open at 7.30, with the audio of the classic invasion story to commence after sunset. Tickets are $20.

An anniversary celebration of The Day of the Triffids, featuring readings from leading Australian authors, has already sold out.

Other highlights of the program include:

-A world-class display of Titan arum plants. These endangered Indonesian plants are the subject of conservation efforts across the globe and grow extremely quickly in the leaf cycle phase of their lives. When they are in their rare Flower Cycle, they produce the infamous 'Corpse Flower', named because of its rotten-flesh scent. Thankfully, for the sake of your nostrils, the plants are not currently flowering.

-The new Plants, Poison and Pop Culture exhibition - which runs until January 30, will offer a chance to explore the real plants behind popular stories - from the mandrakes of the Harry Potter series, to the Wizard of Oz.

-Sci-fi writing workshop for teenagers on Tuesday.

For more information on the full program of events, click HERE

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