Meet the family behind the Tim Tam

The family behind the Tim Tam celebrate sweet years of success


Food
Glen and Julie Andreazza with their children Daniel, Laura, Brendan and Teneeka at their property south of Griffith. Photo by Marie Raccanello Photography Griffith.

Glen and Julie Andreazza with their children Daniel, Laura, Brendan and Teneeka at their property south of Griffith. Photo by Marie Raccanello Photography Griffith.

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The Andreazza family has been supplying a key ingredient for Arnott’s biscuits for 50 years.

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Tim Tams are one of Australian biscuit maker Arnott’s most popular treats – and it’s largely thanks to three generations of a NSW farming family.

Glen and Julie Andreazza’s family have been supplying the variety of soft wheat, a key ingredient for Arnott’s biscuits Tim Tams and Scotch Fingers, for 50 years.

The couple, who run a 370ha grain production operation of rice, wheat and recently corn at Willbriggie south of Griffith, are a finalists for NSW Farmer of the Year.

“I left school at 16 and farming means everything to me, from looking after the environment to monitoring the next generation of farmers,” Mr Andreazza said.

“My son Daniel now works alongside me and we share a passion for the land but from difference points of view. I assist my son with practical knowledge and share my insights and experience and he shares his financial skills.”

Primary Industries Minister Niall Blair said Mr Andreazza balanced environmental practices with making a profit in producing his summer rice crops and winter cereals, which used residual moisture from the rice production.

Glen and Julie Andreazza

Glen and Julie Andreazza

“The farm recycles all its water, with quick-flow irrigation systems and solar panels, which offset the cost of electricity and help reduce emissions created by fossil fuels,” Mr Blair.

In 2006 – the middle of the decade-long drought – Mr Andreazza began drought-proofing his property. He bought a water licence and installed a bore on the farm in addition to a blend of general and high security water allocation.

“The bore has allowed me to utilise 700 megalitres of water per year from the ground to enhance water security in dry years for my crops,” Mr Andreazza said, who is part of the Ricegrowers’ Association and  a director of SunRice.

“This has become a key factor in my drought preparations as this now allows me to grow a crop of some form every season and strengthen my relationships with my key distributors.”

He also hosts breeding trials on their property facilitating education on potential varieties.

The successful 2018 NSW Farmer of the Year winner will be announced at the Farm Writers’ Association of NSW event in Sydney on December 5 at Parliament House. They will win $10,000 and the finalist will receive $2000. The award is a joint initiative between the NSW Department of Primary Industries and NSW Farmers, with the support of SafeWork NSW and The Land newspaper.

The Land

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