Anzac dawn service: A store of memories, both proud and pitiful

By Julie Power
Updated June 28 2018 - 1:30pm, first published April 24 2017 - 12:00am
Before the cenotaph to remember those who lost their lives in World War 1 was erected in Sydney's Martin Place, the site outside the GPO was the site of a recruiting booth to enlist service men. Today it is the site of the Anzac Day Dawn service. This photo shows chief Secretary Mr Black addressing a recruiting meeting Martin Place Sydney in 1915. Photo: State Archives and Records NSW
Before the cenotaph to remember those who lost their lives in World War 1 was erected in Sydney's Martin Place, the site outside the GPO was the site of a recruiting booth to enlist service men. Today it is the site of the Anzac Day Dawn service. This photo shows chief Secretary Mr Black addressing a recruiting meeting Martin Place Sydney in 1915. Photo: State Archives and Records NSW

On the eve of the 90th Martin Place dawn service, Ron Brown reveals the origins of the commemoration.

THE first dawn Anzac Day service in Sydney's Martin Place happened by accident in 1927 when diggers "wending their way home" in the early hours saw an elderly woman placing flowers. It was very near the recruiting booth where many of the 60,000 men who died in World War 1 were enlisted.

Create a free account to read this article

$0/

(min cost $0)

or signup to continue reading

Get the latest Senior news in your inbox

Sign up for our newsletter to stay up to date.

We care about the protection of your data. Read our Privacy Policy.