Isolating South Australians can pick up ballot papers from testing stations

SA election: Testing stations to double as voting pack collection points

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SA ELECTION: People isolating because of COVID-19 will be able to pick up a ballot paper from a testing centre.

SA ELECTION: People isolating because of COVID-19 will be able to pick up a ballot paper from a testing centre.

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COVID-19 impacted South Australians can leave home to collect and post ballot papers.

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COVID-19 positive South Australians and their isolating close contacts will be able to pick up ballot papers from a testing station to vote at the March 19 state election.

In a first for the state, 22 PCR or Rapid Antigen Testing (RAT) locations across South Australia, including those based in regional communities, will double as voting pack collection points.

If South Australians are COVID-positive, a close contact, or have COVID symptoms between Thursday, March 17 and election day on Saturday, March 19, they will be eligible to register online and can then pick up a voting pack at a PCR or RAT collection site.

Under the updated Emergency Management Act, COVID-19 impacted individuals will have permission to leave home to collect their ballot papers and post their completed ballots while still in isolation.

"ECSA has been working in partnership with SA Health, SA Pathology, SAFECOM, and SA Police to ensure that we conduct a safe election in which everyone can take part," said Electoral Commissioner, Mick Sherry.

"We have every confidence that South Australians can vote safely in the 2022 state election.

"Allowing PCR and RAT sites to double as voting pack collection points will allow South Australians who are in isolation or have COVID-19 the opportunity to safely cast their vote this state election," he said.

Mr Sherry said South Australians who will be voting in person this election should feel safe and confident to attend a polling booth.

"We have created a safe voting environment, following many of the COVID safety measures voters will have become used to seeing over the past two years.

"All polling booths will have socially distanced queues, sanitisation stations, mandatory mask-wearing, single-use pencils, fully vaccinated electoral officials and hygiene and density control officers in place," he said.

The Electoral Commission is also expecting many South Australians to vote early via early voting centres set up across the state and by post.

"We've increased the number of early voting centres across the state from 22 at the 2018 state election to 37 this state election," Mr Sherry said.

"This gives eligible voters greater access and time to safely cast their vote in the 12 days prior to the election from Monday, March 7 until Friday, March 18.

"We're also anticipating a significant uptake in postal voting with the eligibility widened this election which we believe will reduce foot traffic on polling day.

"Our message to South Australians is to plan ahead this state election and, if eligible, apply for a postal vote in advance or attend an early voting centre to vote in-person."

For more information, visit www.ecsa.sa.gov.au

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