Explore War Memorial from safety of home

Australian War Memorial's Museum at Home program keeping people connected

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STAY IN TOUCH: The Australian War Memorial may be temporarily closed, but there are still a number of ways to engage with it online.

STAY IN TOUCH: The Australian War Memorial may be temporarily closed, but there are still a number of ways to engage with it online.

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The Australian War Memorial is doing all it can to maintain community connections.

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THE Australian War Memorial may be temporarily closed, but there are still plenty of ways to learn the stories of those who have served.

While the memorial has been closed due to the latest COVID-19 lockdown, its Museum at Home program offers a range of ways to engage online.

The program offers an extensive range of online digital content and stories from Australian servicemen and women.

Online resources include podcasts, documentaries, a range of online exhibitions and a number of other digital experiences.

Australian War Memorial director Matt Anderson said Museum At Home was a way to keep people connected from across the nation and world.

"The extensive podcast series Collected explores artefacts that make up the National Collection of the Memorial," Mr Anderson said.

"Throughout the 31 individual episodes, obscure, popular, strange, and wonderful items in the collection are brought to life through conversations with historians and curators and first-hand accounts from the people connected with these artefacts."

He said the 360-degree video and VR technology exhibition offered a chance to take a closer look at pieces of military technology such as the Lancaster Bomber and Grit - the First World War tank, inside and out.

"Another online exhibition, 3D Treasures, features a selection of collection objects in 3D."

"This gives you a closer view than ever before - and closer than you would ever see on a visit to the Memorial."

The memorial continues to mark commemoration at 4:45pm each day, offering visitors the chance to experience a Last Post Ceremony chosen from its archives.

For students, teachers and home schooling parents or grandparents, the Memorial's Classroom Resources website has many educational activities to keep everyone busy.

There are also a range of online tour options for families and schools to explore.

Online tour experiences include:

Tiny Tours: a range of short films for early learners that encompass a tour and craft activity

Virtually There: thirty-minute films that encourage primary and secondary students to explore the Australian War Memorial and its collection.

Virtual visit: People canuse Google Street View to explore the memorial's galleries at their own pace.

Art of Nation: explore photographs and works of art as founder Charles Bean originally intended, in the space that he designed in 1919.

"We're encouraging our online visitors and their families to share their virtual visits with us and the broader community by posting photos and messages on social media," Mr Anderson said.

Virtual visitors can use the hashtag #MuseumAtHome and tag @AWMemorial to have their social media messages shared on the memorial's website.

You can connect with the Memorial on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and Twitter.

For more information click here.

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