SA plastics ban set to come into force

SA plastics ban set to come into force

National News
From Monday, plastic straws and cutlery will be banned in SA, the first state to take the action.

From Monday, plastic straws and cutlery will be banned in SA, the first state to take the action.

Aa

South Australia's nation-leading ban on single-use plastics, such as straws and cutlery, will provide business opportunities and create jobs, the state govern...

Aa

South Australia's nation-leading ban on single-use plastics, such as straws and cutlery, will provide business opportunities and create jobs, the state government says.

The ban, will come into force from Monday and follows the passing of legislation in September.

Introduction of the measures was delayed because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

"We are the first state in the country to take this action and from tomorrow plastic drinking straws, cutlery and stirrers will be banned from sale, supply and distribution," Environment Minister David Speirs said.

"By being a first-mover nationally we've already seen businesses who manufacture re-useable and compostable alternatives start to set up in South Australia.

"Our ban will have significant economic benefits and create local jobs, as well as being good for the environment."

SA's legislation has also been designed to allow more items to be progressively added to the banned list, with polystyrene cups, bowls and plates to go by early 2022.

Fines could be imposed on businesses that don't comply with the new rules but Mr Speirs said previously he didn't think they would be necessary.

"I don't expect that to be the case because I think first and foremost, consumers are driving this and businesses by their very nature need to respond to consumers," the minister said.

"They need to respond to the market in order to grow their consumer base and make a profit by jumping on board, and making this transition, a transition that many businesses have already gone through."

Mr Speirs said SA's new laws would reduce marine and other litter and would promote the circular economy with a shift away from the "single-use, throwaway mindset".

Australian Associated Press

Aa