Love is in the air at I do! exhibition

Exhibition walks us down the aisle of 180 years of wedding customs and fashions

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TYING THE KNOT: A Fijian Masi wedding dress and Janet Hogan in the mini dress she wore to her wedding to Major Austin John Hogan in 1969.

TYING THE KNOT: A Fijian Masi wedding dress and Janet Hogan in the mini dress she wore to her wedding to Major Austin John Hogan in 1969.

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I Do! Wedding Stories from Queensland shows how the tradition of marriage has helped shape society and in turn been shaped by changing times.

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There's something magical about the ritual of weddings. They're the promise of true love, of sharing and caring and happy ever afters.

The Queensland Museum is giving us a chance to wallow in jasmine-scented nostalgia while we walk down the aisle of the changing customs and fashions of weddings from the last 180 years in its latest exhibition I Do! Wedding Stories from Queensland.

From an 1800s wedding gown to present day dresses and suits, I Do! shares romantic, thought-provoking and sometimes challenging stories.

More than 40 gowns, garments and outfits show how the tradition of marriage has helped shape society and in turn been shaped by changing times.

The display ranges from glorious fairytale white wedding gowns to mini-dresses and cullotes worn by Queensland women in the '60s and outfits reflecting the many cultures from across the world who have made Australia home.

There's the mini-dress worn in 1969 by Janet Hogan who, having set a new benchmark as the State Library of Queensland's first science librarian, also became the first married female public servant in the state.

On display are the matching outfits worn by one of Queensland's first same-sex couples, and the wedding gowns of Australian active wear guru Lorna Jane Clarkson, and well-known jewellery designer Christie Nicolaides who departed from the tradition of a white wedding with her striking gown by Italian design house Dolce & Gabbana.

There's also the exquisite wedding dress made by a mother for a Hmong girl when she was a tiny child.

Stories of war brides and lockdown weddings and a commission from Far North Queensland Aboriginal artist Simone Arnol exploring the impact of colonisation of First Nations people also feature.

The exhibition explores five themes - Love; Rights, Rites and Rituals; Homes; Tradition; and Circumstances. Exhibits are drawn from the museum's collection and contemporary loans.

I Do! Wedding Stories from Queensland runs until February 21. Tickets $10/$8.

  • Bookings are required to visit the museum: 3840-7555, www.qm.qld.gov.au
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