Don't let a scammer spoil your Mother's Day

Buying online for Mother's Day? There's less chance of getting scammed if you support a local business

Money
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Dodgy websites, late deliveries, and a questionable quality of products are just a few things you don't want to have to deal with when shopping for a gift this Mother's Day.

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Mother's Day is just round the corner and as some of us still can't safely get together with mums and nonnas we've increasingly turned online to buy a gift to show we care.

However, online purchasers are being warned to be vigilant of Mother's Day scams this year, as some unscrupulous traders seek coronavirus pandemic profits.

"Dodgy websites, late deliveries, and a questionable quality of products are just a few things you don't want to have to deal with when shopping for a gift this Mother's Day," said Queensland Attorney-General and Minister for Justice Yvette D'Ath.

"One way to ensure you don't deliver a dud on Mother's Day is to support a small or local business you trust by visiting them online.

"Scammers can use the anonymous nature of the internet to rip off unsuspecting shoppers. Buying through the website of a local trader you know reduces this risk.

"Do your research, check prices on the websites of other stores, read reviews of products and retailers from trusted sources, and ask friends and family."

Mrs D'Ath said shoppers should ensure they check the website is secure before they make any payments.

"Look for the 'HTTPS' or a padlock icon in the address bar," she said.

"Consumers have the same rights and protections under the Australian Consumer Law, whether they are buying online or instore.

"Consumers should always read the terms and conditions and check delivery times as you wouldn't want mum's gift arriving late.

"If you think you're being scammed, contact the Office of Fair Trading."

For more information about online shopping safety, visit https://www.qld.gov.au/law/fair-trading

Read more: NBN Co warns of a rise in scam activity

Read more: Coronavirus scammers target vulnerable

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