"One day at a time": Sue Lennox shares her lockdown advice

NSW Senior Australian of the Year Sue Lennox shares hope

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INSPIRATION: Sue Lennox was awarded the NSW Senior Australian of the Year award last year for her environmental work. Photo: NADC/Salty Dingo.

INSPIRATION: Sue Lennox was awarded the NSW Senior Australian of the Year award last year for her environmental work. Photo: NADC/Salty Dingo.

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How the NSW Senior Australian of the Year manages isolation.

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THIS lockdown is tough. As we rally together in isolation, some of Australia's most inspiring people are sending messages of hope.

The 2020 Australian of the Year Award recipients are sharing their tips and inspirational advice during lockdown through a series of videos on the Australian of the Year Facebook page.

Joining them is this year's NSW Senior Australian of the Year Sue Lennox.

Speaking to The Senior via Skype from her Macadamia farm in northern NSW, the environmental educator encouraged people to take each day as it comes.

"I think if I thought about being in lockdown for six weeks, I would have been depressed. But I'm taking one day at a time and doing well," she said.

Sue was awarded the NSW Senior Australian of the Year title last November in recognition for her work that encourages people to become more environmentally aware.

She has been focusing on staying active and getting out into the sun daily.

"One of the things sustaining me at the moment is expanding my efforts to grow my own food," she said.

"It's something you can do even in isolation in a unit is growing bean sprouts."

She also encouraged people to take advantage of everything the virtual world has to offer.

"There are a lot of online opportunities, like courses and meetings. I've been connecting with people I haven't connected with in ages."

Sue said she was quite lucky to be on the same farm as her children and grandkids, but was able to stay in touch with loved ones using technology - celebrating her niece's birthday on Zoom last week.

Her business, OzGreen, has also been re-invented to function in the online sphere.

"It's had a big impact on our organisation. We now do our existing programs online and are re-thinking what we're doing.

"We were doing citizen science programs testing water quality but unfortunately we've had to drop that."

Sue has also launched a Pulse of the Pandemic program, with a live video on social media to update people on the unfolding health situation as well as continue discussing other major concerns such as climate change.

"We want to make sure the challenges we face don't fall off the radar."

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