$250 supermarket voucher too good to be true, Scamwatch warns

COVID-19 scam offering grocery vouchers with Coles, Woolworths

Scams
DO NOT CLICK: Don't be fooled by this scam that's arriving in people's inboxes this week, police warn. Photo: NSW POLICE

DO NOT CLICK: Don't be fooled by this scam that's arriving in people's inboxes this week, police warn. Photo: NSW POLICE

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Don't be fooled by this scam, police warn.

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IF you've just had a $250 shopping voucher for Coles or Woolworths land in your inbox, NSW Police have one word for you - delete.

This week scammers have been impersonating the two supermarket giants claiming the shopping voucher has been issued to support people during the coronavirus pandemic.

"Coles is giving away free groceries worth $250 to support the nation during Corona pandemic," the scam voucher says.

It also instructs people to "hurry up! Collect your free voucher" with a hyperlink leading people to the scam website.

NSW Police across the Central West have taken to their social media sites to warn community members not to click.

"The scammers impersonating Woolworths from earlier this week are now impersonating Coles; again claiming a $250 shopping voucher for #COVID19au," police posted.

"Don't share and don't click the link."

Scamwatch said Australians should be aware that scammers are adapting existing technology to play on people's fears around coronavirus and selling products claiming to prevent or cure the virus.

Since January 1, 2020, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission's (ACCC) Scamwatch has received 94 reports of scams about coronavirus, but warns figures are starting to climb.

DO NOT CLICK: Don't be fooled by this scam that's arriving in people's inboxes this week, police warn. Photo: NSW POLICE

DO NOT CLICK: Don't be fooled by this scam that's arriving in people's inboxes this week, police warn. Photo: NSW POLICE

It said phishing scams are being sent via email or text message that claim to be providing official information on coronavirus but are attempts to try and obtain personal data.

"Unfortunately, scammers are using the uncertainty around COVID-19, or coronavirus, to take advantage of people," ACCC deputy chair Delia Rickard said.

Other scams include people receiving misinformation about cures for coronavirus and investment scams claiming coronavirus has created opportunities to make money.

"We've had a wide variety of scams reported to us, including fake online stores selling products claiming to be a vaccine or cure for coronavirus, and stores selling products such as face masks and not providing the goods."

Visit Scamwatch for more information.

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