Emily wants the scoop on dogs' business

Dog poo as compost: are you ready for it?

Pets
GROWING INTEREST: Researchers are looking at the feasibility of composting dog poo for use in backyard food production.

GROWING INTEREST: Researchers are looking at the feasibility of composting dog poo for use in backyard food production.

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Doggy doo or doggy don't...would you fertilize your garden veggies with pooch poo?

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"Waste not, want not" takes on a whole new meaning for researcher and dog owner Emily Bryson.

The PhD candidate is studying what to do with the poo generated by Australians' five million pet pooches.

Ms Bryson, from Central Queensland University, is investigating the potential for domestic dog mess to be composted at home for use in backyard food production.

To find out, she is running survey is to find out dog owners' views and current habits regarding the collection and disposal of their pet's faeces.

Data from the survey will be analysed to identify perceived risks, barriers and interest in composting of dog faeces and using the end product on plants.

Results will help inform a future participant-based field trial within this project as well as potential community and council-based composting initiatives.

The anonymous online survey comprises multiple-choice and open-ended questions, and will take 10-15 minutes.

Participants, who must have at least one dog, will be asked to explore frequency, method and motivation to collect and dispose of their dog's faeces both at, and away from, home.

They will also be able to describe their home compost system, if relevant, and give opinions on dog faeces in general and their willingness to compost it.

Disposal of dog faeces is a big business worldwide. According to one US disposal company, America's 83 million pet dogs produce 10.6 million tonnes of poop every year - enough to fill a line of semi-trailers stretching coast to coast.

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