Walk this way: easy does it on Tassie's Cradle Coast

Short walks of the Cradle Coast: Easy treks in Tasmania

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EASY DOES IT: The Enchanted Walk in Cradle Mountain is a 20-minute boardwalk circuit with three interpretive tunnels. Photo: Tourism Tasmania/Geoffrey Lea.

EASY DOES IT: The Enchanted Walk in Cradle Mountain is a 20-minute boardwalk circuit with three interpretive tunnels. Photo: Tourism Tasmania/Geoffrey Lea.

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Accessible hikes on Tasmania's Cradle Coast.

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You're spoiled for choice for walks in Tasmania, particularly on the Cradle Coast on the west of the island.

But you don't have to set out for a full day's hike - with all the gear in tow - to enjoy the region's natural beauty.

There's now a great online resource, with an interactive map, detailing the many short walks in the region.

The Huon Pine Walk at Corinna takes around 20 minutes and is a breezy stroll under a canopy of conifers.

WINTER WONDERLAND: Experience the magic of Cradle Mountain on the easy Enchanted Walk. Photo: Paul Fleming.

WINTER WONDERLAND: Experience the magic of Cradle Mountain on the easy Enchanted Walk. Photo: Paul Fleming.

Dip Falls, between Stanley and Wynyard, is also a must-see and considered one of the most beautiful waterfalls in Tassie.

Pack a picnic and take the 2km track to Big Tree Reserve afterward to sit at the base of magificent old growth trees.

And while thousands of hikers embark of Cradle Mountain's Overland Track every year, there are plenty of shorter trails to choose from if you're after a day walk.

Starting from Cradle Mountain Lodge, Knvey Falls is a scenic 45 minutes walk, while the Enchanted Walk is a 20-minute boardwalk circuit with three interpretive tunnels.

You can also head to the Interpretation Centre for the 10-minute Pencil Pine Falls and Rainforest Walk.

And good news for anyone wanting to experience the spectacular views at Horsetails Falls near Queenstown. There is a new relatively easy walk suitable for most visitors who journey down the scenic Lyell Highway.

Hugging the craggy hills, the boardwalk takes walkers closer to the falls, which cascade over 50 metres down the steep cliff face. The boardwalk was designed by a local company to replace an informal track, and is now safe in wet weather.

ON THE BOARDWALK: The Horsetail Falls walk near Queenstown is suitable for most visitors. Photo: Jess Bonde.

ON THE BOARDWALK: The Horsetail Falls walk near Queenstown is suitable for most visitors. Photo: Jess Bonde.

Nearby the Lake St Clair, Franklin Nature Trail, Nelson Falls and Donaghys Hill walks make this area a new walking destination in its own right.

Check out the map at visitcradlecoast.com.au/experience/short-walks/

If you're around Launceston, a visit to Cataract Gorge is a must.

Walk Cataract Gorge has launched a new Jewel of Launceston tour, taking guests on a guided walk through the stunning gorge.

Over an hour, hear about the natural history of the gorge and the precarious balance between nature and society.

Guests will be able to smell, touch and even taste their way through the gorge and across First Basin, finishing up near Basin Cottage, for further self exploration at leisure after the tour.

The hour-long tours depart 10.30am daily, $22 per person. Book at www.walkcataractgorge.rezdy.com

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