Grandchild inspires Isa to get crafty

Epilepsy Tasmania volunteer Isa Kingston gets crafty, thanks to granddaughter

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PURPLE WAYS: Hobart grandmother Isa Kingston was inspired by her granddaughter, who has epilepsy, to make purple toys to raise money for Epilepsy Tasmania.

PURPLE WAYS: Hobart grandmother Isa Kingston was inspired by her granddaughter, who has epilepsy, to make purple toys to raise money for Epilepsy Tasmania.

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'It's hard to watch and not be able to help': Why gran Isa got crafty for epilepsy

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A common brain condition that takes the form of recurring seizures, epilepsy can develop at any age regardless of ethnicity or gender.

But the condition is far more than just seizures, according to Epilepsy Tasmania volunteer, Isa Kingston from Rokeby.

The grandmother of three decided to volunteer with the charity after her granddaughter Natalie was diagnosed with epilepsy.

The seven-year-old girl, who also has cerebral palsy, lives in Cairns with her mum, dad and sister Lisa.

“I have watched Natalie grow into a beautiful girl,” said Isa.

“Every time I visit them in Cairns I think what can I do to help my family?”

“I do not have medical knowledge.

“It is very hard to watch Natalie and her family suffer and not be able to help apart from helping Mum with housework and playing with the girls to give Natalie some exercise.”

But after talking to other Epilepsy Tamania volunteers she met in a Hobart mall, Isa became interested in finding out more.

“I wondered how I could help raise funds for research that could help Natalie and others like her.”

Isa spent  hours making purple items to sell at Salamanca Market. “I knitted toys and dolls’ blankets.

“I also asked two friends to make purple items for me – one crocheted six hats, two headbands and a toy; and the other knitted six jumpers and three ponchos,” she said.

“I thank them from the bottom of my heart.”

“My prayer, wish and hope is to find a cure or cause that would prevent epilepsy.”

“My prayer, wish and hope is to find a cure or cause that would prevent epilepsy.” - Epilepsy Tasmania volunteer Isa Kingston

Epilepsy Tasmania is a not-for-profit community organisation improving the quality of life of Tasmanians with epilepsy, and those around them, through education, coordination and support.

Around 20,000 Tasmanians have epilepsy and an additional 80,000 family members, colleagues and friends are affected in some way.

One-fifth of the state’s population is touched by epilepsy, yet the condition still has an unfortunate stigma according to Epilepsy Tasmania.

The not-for-profit says just over half of Tasmanians with epilepsy have experienced discrimination as a result of their condition during the last year.

  • Volunteering details, epilepsytasmania.org.au
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