Tips to stay well in winter

Tips to stay well in winter

Wellbeing
Regular hand washing is just one of the Western Australian government's tips for beating the winter blues.

Regular hand washing is just one of the Western Australian government's tips for beating the winter blues.

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HERE are some handy tips to help you, and those close to you, stay fit and healthy this winter.

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AS THE nation descends into the heart of winter, the WA government urges people to do all they can to stay healthy as temperatures drop.

Here are some handy tips to help you, and those close to you, stay fit and healthy this winter.

  • Colds and flu are especially common in winter. Make sure you are immunised and take sensible steps to prevent infection or spreading infection such as covering your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, throwing tissues in the bin after use, washing your hands often with soap and water, using alcohol-based hand sanitisers, avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth, and try to avoid close contact with people who have a flu-like illness.
  • Eating food high in nutritional value provides the body with vitamins, rich carbohydrates and fats that can assist a speedy recovery. Eat foods high in antioxidants, protein, fibre, vitamins B, C, D and E and low in sugars and fats.
  • In summer, the hot weather reminds us we are thirsty, but it is important to stay hydrated in winter too. Changes in temperature, blustery weather and heating systems can also exacerbate a range of skin conditions including eczema. Keeping hydrated will help keep skin healthy, flush out toxins and ward off winter bugs.
  • Rainfall and darkness can contribute to the growth of mould in the home. Mould can be found in places including wardrobe spaces that lack ventilation, wet areas like bathrooms and laundries, and areas that are close to retaining walls and reticulated gardens. Mould can cause a number of health conditions. Make sure your home is well ventilated and has adequate heating and that surfaces that frequently get wet are kept dry.
  • A change of climate can trigger asthma attacks in children. Breathing in cold air, wood smoke, and mould associated with winter climates can also induce symptoms. If you have asthma and are experiencing symptoms, follow the advice of your asthma action plan. People experiencing asthma for the first time should see their doctor. Call 000 if experiencing or dealing with a life threatening attack.

Visit healthywa.wa.gov.au/Articles/S_T/Staying-healthy-in-winterfor a range of other tips including how to plan for travel, the importance of staying active, minimising effects of wood smoke, and the importance of staying warm.

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