Invitation to a dance: come join the brolgas

Invitation to a dance: come join the brolgas

Domestic travel
WHAT A SHOW – During its dance, the brolga will occasionally stop, throw back its head and trumpet wildly.

WHAT A SHOW – During its dance, the brolga will occasionally stop, throw back its head and trumpet wildly.

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Crane Week, from September 19-23 in the Atherton Tablelands, is a celebration of these stately migratory birds – the brolga and rarer sarus crane.

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They’re the stuff of myth and legend. And every year, large flocks of cranes descend upon Atherton Tablelands for the tropical winter.

Crane Week, from September 19-23, is a celebration of these stately migratory birds – the brolga and rarer sarus crane.

It’s a chance for visitors and bird-lovers to watch the cranes leap and dance, bugle and call – and get some great photos while learning more about these fascinating birds.

One of the places the cranes come to roost every year is near Malanda in far north Queensland.

Malanda Information Centre’s Caroline O’Reilly said there are places nearby where you can see the cranes hunting for grubs.

“Once the rains come, the mating pairs migrate back to the wetter regions of northern Australia, leaving the juvenile birds to feed up before they also head back to their breeding grounds,” she said.

“During Crane Week, we aim to educate the general public in these amazing birds. “The general public can watch, learn and photograph, and help to spread an appreciation of cranes, and help to ensure a safe future for them in the beautiful region of northern Australia.”

The centre has displays and information sheets all through Crane Week.

There are also daily activities at the visitor centre and on September 23 there is a special Sunset and Sarus evening.

Visitors can spend the late afternoon or early evening at Bromfield Swamp eating local produce and watching the cranes come back to roost.

Bookings are essential via the visitor centre.

www.craneweek.orgwww.athertontablelands.com.au

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